Monday, April 18, 2011

arts festival

We went to the arts festival, the other day. 
I tried to limit the explanations to the artists I really liked,

This is Gregory Story
"Working in clay since he was a child, Gregory Story strives to create the unexpected. The surfaces of his work often trick the eye and appear to be wood or steel or glass. His pieces take shapes that are at once traditional and modern. Story plays with patterns the way a painter plays with light, owing much of his aesthetic to a love of textiles. His wall sculptures, called Wall Balls, are an exciting alternative to 2D art, and are dramatic, playful, and joyous. More than anything, Story just wants to make you happy!" source

Gregory Story
 or those that took the time to talk to me about their work.
Gregory Story

Gregory Story

http://www.juliehavel.com 
http://www.juliehavel.com

http://www.juliehavel.com
http://www.chuckkaiser.com
Chuck told me how he converted a wood burning tool that he uses for wax. I talked to him about how unique his use of wax is in his work.
http://www.juliehavel.com
This is Julie Havel.
"My process includes six layers of Acrylic and array of textural mixed media elements. I include sand, papers, crushed leaves, oil pastels, threads and textiles. My paintings are created by using alternate applications including imprinted plastics, metal rollers and palette knives. They are painted on gallery wrapped canvas." -Julie Havel

Julie Havel

Julie Havel

Julie Havel

Julie Havel
http://www.chuckkaiser.com
When Chuck explained his layers of newspaper and the meaning behind his pieces they were more complex and interesting. Than just simple shapes of color.
Chuck Kaiser told me that when people ask him, what do you do with a degree in philosophy? His answer is this artwork.
The face and the system underneath. Are the two eyes competing or flying towards each other?
http://www.chuckkaiser.com
 When I would tell him what images I saw in his work he said, "You can see whatever you want." When I mentioned galleries he said, "Yeah, but selling art in the street pays the most."
http://theresahoneywell.com/artwork/

http://theresahoneywell.com/artwork/
 Theresa told me she invented the technique of making her images of fiber by accident.
http://theresahoneywell.com/artwork/

Theresa had these really cute purses I didn't get photos of. She makes them as break from her other stuff.
http://theresahoneywell.com/artwork/

 She said she wasn't allowed to display them in front of her booth. 

photo taken by my guy
 She said it had something to do with art jury rules.

The images are made out of thread, and stored in a shadow box with material behind it.

taken by my guy

http://theresahoneywell.com/artwork/
http://theresahoneywell.com/artwork/
http://theresahoneywell.com/artwork/
"This series of work utilizes a sewing technique that I developed over the past four years. Most of the designs and images are based on vintage tattoo designs. My designs are made in the similar labor intense way that a tattoo is made, using only a needle to draw with, but instead of ink on skin, my medium is only thread on thread. I use tattoo images for the designs because of their opposite appeal. I am rendering a typically macho icon into something more delicate and softer by utilizing traditional materials."- Theresa Honeywell taken from source
This motorcycle is life size and I'm pretty sure Theresa knitted it all.

Here's another image made by Theresa. The photo was taken by my guy.

This is art by Seung Lee.
I didn't get a chance to talk to him because he was talking to someone else.
 "My work is influenced by the two poles of ying and yang, use of objects in nature symbolize the 'circle of life'. Acrylic painting on woodcut with collage of pre-painted paper and woodblock print". Seung Lee source

Seung Lee
 He had two different booths. One booth of mixed media.
Seung Lee
  One booth was of printings. His booths were both very dimensional and interesting.
Seung Lee
  

Seung Lee


Seung Lee

Seung Lee

Seung Lee


These ceramics are by Gregory Story.

What I found interesting about this subject matter, 

is how the artist takes what appears to be everyday materials and combines them to form these seemingly simple sculptures.


Sorry I don't know the artist's name. 


I don't know these artists either.


These are framed squares of fused glass made into tiles.


These guys sounded like the music I hear when I'm in New Orleans. 

I have no clue who made this work.



I'm really sorry, but the artist is unknown to me.

This is Chuck Kaiser.
"In 1985, while in the midst of my college career, (one which started as the pursuit of a music degree and ended with a degree in Philosophy) I stumbled upon the batik process. I knew almost immediately that I had found a medium that satisfied both my creative and analytical tendencies.  

http://www.chuckkaiser.com/
Over the years I’ve been able to maintain my interest and love of batik by stretching the bounds of the medium. What you see before you today is the culmination of 25 years of incessant dabbling and exploration. 


Chuck Kaiser
Although in many cases I still do my initial “sketches” as fiber batiks, the majority of my work is executed on non-traditional surfaces such as newspaper and museum board, with the batik process serving as the core element of a mixed media approach to contemporary art.

Kaiser
Along with waxes and dyes, my work includes the use of various texts, ink, colored pencil, acrylics and encaustics.
 To sum it up, I view my work as Contemporary American Batik.
Chuck Kaiser

As for inspiration, I find it in all things, good and bad. My subject matter runs the gamut of current events to classical philosophy.  My choice of newspaper as a surface lies somewhere between the information presented in the paper and my desire to promote a greener approach to life.
Chuck Kaiser
 I intend it to be an approach to batik as reflective of my culture and background as African or Indonesian batiks would be of the work created by artists from those respective cultures. In essence, my work is to traditional batik as jazz is to classical music. Enjoy." -Chuck Kaiser taken from source

Here is some pretty stuff, but who knows who made it?

I saw a white guy wearing overalls and a white shirt. He had tattoos that said "Dirty Southern."


These pieces are basket weaved together.
 I didn't get the artist's name. However, chick in the blue-grey blouse isn't her.
The flower frames are made of tree branches.
This is Julie Havel's booth.
 The rest of the artists' work pictured here is a mystery to me.
What was fascinating about this stuff was they were photographs behind the sculptures.

There was an artist, who I am NOT mentioning any names. I also am NOT showing any photos of his/her work. 


Under the artist statement or whatever it said their work represented a good life and simpler time. 

Something about joy in going back to  that place or some such nonsense. 

The images looked like people chatting while picking cotton, farming, doing housework etc.


I immediately thought of slavery. Maybe I was I reading something out of nothing? 
I hope I misunderstood. I hope that wasn't their intention.

Speaking of offensives. There were two ladies that had late 70's early 80's feathered hair.  

I wish I could find something that resembles what I saw. Since I can't, just imagine.  Deliberately cut, layered, curled, and styled in that bad hair fashion. 
As far as I'm concerned these image here could be of current people. Possibly from different cultures or another country? These images didn't bother me. 

From a distance the colors appeared to be dots creating form, texture, and depth. Up close I could see they were actually colored scribblings. It was magnificent!

I know all about bad hair. I've worn it. Some would say I still do.
I wondered if those two ladies with the bad hair were friends, sisters, or a couple? Not that it matters.

You know how sometimes couples look alike? Or how pets resemble their owners? 
Here's some band that played Texas, (Southern Rock) cover songs like ZZ Top and Stevie Ray Vaughn.

I ran into one of my friends who I hadn't spotted in the crowd.

 Everyone was wearing sunglasses. My friend said her husband recognized me. 
But hey, I was wearing sunglasses too.
Which some would say proves the point of the bad hair. I must've been wearing.

5 comments:

  1. ugh, i haven't been to one of these outdoor art shows in SO long. such amazing pieces, and it's always so incredible to talk to the artists!
    this summer. for sure.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This is such an interesting post, thanks for sharing. :)


    xoxo,
    Addie
    The Cat Hag

    ReplyDelete
  3. i loved the ceramics and the fiber so cute and rad and i loved loved loved the rad cupcake!

    ReplyDelete

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